Study proving both growth rates and stress affected by food content

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Study proving both growth rates and stress affected by food content

September 19, 2016 - 14:37

While this study was done on Tilapia, the results proving that diet formations can enhance both growth rates and stress response have direct correlation to the Koi hobby.  Read the abstract by clicking on the title or picture...

Examination of the Effects of Dietary Protein and Lipid Levels on
Growth and Stress Tolerance of Juvenile Tilapia, Oreochromis
niloticus
Christopher G. Hooley
USFWS, Bozeman Fish Technology Center, Bozeman, Montana 59715, USA
Department of Animal and Range Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana
59715, USA
Frederic T. Barrows
USDA-Agricultural Research Service Bozeman Fish Technology Center, Bozeman, Montana
59715, USA
John Paterson
Department of Animal and Range Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana
59715, USA
Wendy M. Sealey1,2
USFWS, Bozeman Fish Technology Center, Bozeman, Montana 59715, USA

Abstract
Tilapia is the second most consumed farmed fish after carp and the most widely grown farmed
fish. However, significant price increases in ingredients in recent years threaten profitability of the
industry because dietary costs are approximately 60% of production costs. Therefore, the objective
of this study was to optimize dietary protein and lipid levels of juvenile tilapia cultured in high-intensity
recirculating-water system and assess dietary effects on stress tolerance. To achieve this objective, a
factorial treatment design with diets formulated to contain three levels of dietary protein (28, 32, and
36%) and three levels of dietary lipid (3, 6, and 9%) was employed. Juvenile tilapia (34.5±0.4 g initial
weight) were randomly assigned to each of 24 tanks and fed one of the nine diets, three feedings per day
to apparent satiation, 6 d/wk for 12 wk. Fish were weighed and counted every 3wk and feed consumed
recorded weekly. Tilapia weight gain, feed conversion, feed intake, and proximate composition were
significantly affected by diet. Following the feeding trial, tilapia were subjected to a 24 h simulated
live haul where fish were stocked into a static water system at 0.24 kg/L of water. Glucose, lactate,
and cortisol measurements were taken at time 0, 24, and 72 h after fish were placed into hauling
containers. There was significant effects (P<0.05) of crude lipid and crude protein on blood chemistry
parameters. These data indicate that practical diet formulations can be improved to enhance growth
rates, production of tilapia, and stress response during live hauls.

JOURNAL OF THE
WORLD AQUACULTURE SOCIETY
Vol. 45, No. 2
April, 2014
doi: 10.1111/jwas.12110

 


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