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Hello Koi Enthusiasts!

This blog is here to provide a spot for various things that do or might pertain to Koi. This stuff is intended for your entertainment, and is not meant to meet the stricter standards of our ebooks and courses, so use this info carefully and at your own risk. The short articles here may be descriptions of techniques that have proved effective, an introduction to new fish research, facts, graphs or just something FUN about fish! This information can be a springboard for your imagination and an entertaining place to learn something new. Information that was first published in Question of the Week can be found here.

The more we learn about Koi, the more FUN this hobby is - and we always say - if you're not havin' FUN, you're not doin' it right!

A 370-milion-year-old, primitive fish sported a weird pair of fins just below its anus, new research shows.  An article from "Livescience"after the break...  Now - how many fins do our Koi have???

Sometimes, you just need a chuckle...

Have you wanted to learn to use a Microscope to be a better Koi keeper, but just haven't found the time?  Maybe you have a scope, but never get it out and use it? Here's your opportunity - more info after the break...

Yes, you can use the standard shapes above to calculate volume, but they are notoriously inaccurate.  Mike Anger, CKK,  teaches you a simple and ACCURATE way to calculate your pond's volume, after the break...  If you want to learn more, take K.O.I. Pond Construction #202 - CLICK HERE for more information about the course.

Cindy Badder, CKK and Koi Health Expert frequently working on Koiphen, wrote some great little articles on Parasites.  This one is about the dreaded "Ich."  Want to get a chance to see these buggies in person?  Come to the K.O.I. Lab at the PNKCA Convention on June 19, 2015!  CLICK HERE for more info on the Lab.  I've only posted 3 of Cindy's articles - do you want to learn more about Koi Parasites?  Take K.O.I. Diagnosis and Treatment #207 - CLICK HERE for info about the course.   Full text after the break...

Cindy Badder, CKK and Koi Health Expert frequently working on Koiphen, wrote some great little articles on Parasites.  This one is about Anchor Worm.  Want to get a chance to see these buggies in person?  Come to the K.O.I. Lab at the PNKCA Convention on June 19, 2015!  CLICK HERE for more info on the Lab.  I've only posted 3 of Cindy's articles - do you want to learn more about Koi Parasites?  Take K.O.I. Diagnosis and Treatment #207 - CLICK HERE for info about the course.  Full text after the break...

Cindy Badder, CKK and Koi Health Expert frequently working on Koiphen, wrote some great little articles on Parasites.  This one is about Fish Lice.  Want to get a chance to see these buggies in person?  Come to the K.O.I. Lab at the PNKCA Convention on June 19, 2015!  CLICK HERE for more info on the Lab.  I've only posted 3 of Cindy's articles - do you want to learn more about Koi Parasites?  Take K.O.I. Diagnosis and Treatment #207 - CLICK HERE for info about the course.  Full text after the break...

Why is every Koi pond that you see a different depth?  Becuase they should be different!  See anaylsis after the break...

The following are some great ideas, collected over the years by Spike Cover. - See more at: http://koiorganisationinternational.org/?q=koi-articles/tips-and-tricks-...
The following are some great ideas, collected over the years by Spike Cover. - See more at: http://koiorganisationinternational.org/?q=koi-articles/tips-and-tricks-...

Over the years, Spike Cover collected some really clever tips and tricks of use to all Koi Keepers!  Text after the break...

The other day, I was talking  to Syd Mitchell, Water Quality Guru Extraordinaire.  We were discussing ponds that have the propensity to pH crash, and he said he knew of some folks using an Automatic Dosing system for Baking Soda (if you don't know why stable pH or why adding Baking Soda may be important to your pond, you might want to invest a few bucks, and read "Alkalinity and pH").  Syd was explaining how to make your own dosing system - schematic and more info after the break...

We all know that there are good bacteria and bad bacteria.  Every organism has good bacteria in the gut that are essential to life, but pathogenic bacteria are an ever increasing problem.  They can evolve and change faster than we can create new anti-biotics to destroy them.  A big part of research is in making sure that the bad bugs don't escape whle we're studying them in the lab.  Some help in that direction may be on the way!  Thanks to Spike Cover for finding this article - full text after the break...

There is a new monitoring system available for Koi ponds that measures pH and KH3 (not TAN), as well as temperature and water level.  It graphs the results of pH and KH3, and sends alerts to your phone or computer.  WOW!  More info and the web site link below the break...

Scientists have discovered how prized bluefin tuna keep their hearts pumping during temperature changes that would stop a human heart. The research helps to answer important questions about how fish react to rapid temperature changes, and may lead us to better understanding of how our Koi function.  Full story below the break...

Sue Boydstun sent me these beautful cards - and I figured maybe some of you might also be interested in buying them!  Contact and pricing info after the break...

One club member to another - "Never ask Google for Koi Health advice...  My Kohaku went from 'occasionally flashing' to 'clinically dead' in 3 clicks..."

So that's why you should come to K.O.I. when you have a question - Current, Accurate and Useful info that can really help!

 

We have all heard of the dangers of drug-resistant bacteria like MRSA.  That is why this discovery might be a key to future antibiotics that can help both our Koi and ourselves.

We all know that Koi can survive winter under the ice in ponds - but did you know that a new robot has found fish beneath the Antarctic ice, and this robot could be used to explore Europa?  This article is from the University of Nebraska- Lincoln.

Have you heard about Rain Gardens?  We all know that rain-water runoff can be a big problem to Koi ponds, mostly cause it carries in toxins from the surrounding landscape.  Rain Gardens - a 'bioretention system' help!  While this study pertains to the Pacific Northwest and Salmon, the principles can be incorporated into our Koi pond landscapes.  Another thought - just try and get everyone in the neighborhood not to use chemicals on their lawns and gardens...  Full story after the break...

Here's a pic of my pond this morning!  Typical January day in Connecticut...   In the middle, under the evergreens is my 4-foot waterfall, and that stripe across the middle?  That's the net that stays over the pond from October to April to keep the leaves down to a dull roar...  Notice the Beech trees at the right keep their brown leaves all winter, dropping them occasionally.  This is only 6 inches of snow - tomorrow, we're in for a blizzard with 18 inches predicted, maybe more...  But I still LOVE winter - see why below the break...  BTW - It's now been exactly a year since we started the K.O.I. blog, and we've posted nearly 100 articles for you to enjoy and learn from.  Thanks to all our contributors!  If you find it useful, or have ideas for articles - please email me:  pattist@snet.net   Thanks for being here!

Neat idea for an aquarium - a stackable "Fish Hotel!"  Details after the break...

We all know watching Koi is very relaxing.  Turns out that hobbies help us in many ways!  Read more below the break...

While some of our Koi are hermaphroditic (have reproductive organs of both males and females), they don't change gender.  Turns out Clown Fish are much more interesting than Disney led us to believe!  Read more about it after the break...

Fish Robots are getting better.!  Maybe they will make an affordable one that we can use to watch our Koi!  More after the break...

When we are looking for pathogens or studying cells, we use a microscope.  But the problem has been that there has always been a trade-off between imaging speed, detail or the well-being of the sample.  Koi keepers using microscopes are well familiar with the problem - if you scrape a Koi and put the resulting mucus on a slide, you only have a few minutes to find and identify the bug before it dies and stops moving.  That's because the intense light used to see into the sample actually cooks the bugs.  This article explains new techniques being used for microscopy, and hopefully options that will become available to Koi keepers in the future!  A link to the pdf, thanks to the HHMI Bulletin Winter 2015, is provided below the break.

These are the so-called Five Freedoms that were developed by John Webster in 1995.

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!If you're not havin' FUN, you're not doin' it right


 

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