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Hello Koi Enthusiasts!

This blog is here to provide a spot for various things that do or might pertain to Koi. This stuff is intended for your entertainment, and is not meant to meet the stricter standards of our ebooks and courses, so use this info carefully and at your own risk. The short articles here may be descriptions of techniques that have proved effective, an introduction to new fish research, facts, graphs or just something FUN about fish! This information can be a springboard for your imagination and an entertaining place to learn something new. Information that was first published in Question of the Week can be found here.

The more we learn about Koi, the more FUN this hobby is - and we always say - if you're not havin' FUN, you're not doin' it right!

From time to time, some fish may develop swim bladder problems and these tend to manifest as buoyancy disorders – either the fish is floating to the top (positively buoyant), or sinking to the bottom (negatively buoyant). Fish in their natural healthy state should be relatively neutrally buoyant, or only just slightly negatively buoyant.  Read more by clicking on the title or picture...

This question is answered by Dr. Loh, the fish vet from Australia.  Click on the title or picture to read the article.

Thinking of breeding fish and growing them out? This paper describes that feeding regimes most conducive to growth do not necessarily maximize reproductive success in the zebra danio. Feeding frequency for reproductive success is once every couple of days to to 3x/day, whereas to maximise growth rate, feeding them 5x/day is optimal.  Read the paper's abstract by clicking on the title or picture...

The growth of all fish is not regulated by growth inhibitory hormones, but Koi and goldfish growth is.  Read a short answer of why Koi and goldfish do not outgrow their ponds by clicking on the title or picture...

Read more about the study by clicking on the title or picture...

Wannon Water Company have been undertaking trials over the past 8 years in conjunction with Deakin University to investigate the use of fish to reduce sludge volumes in primary effluent lagoons.  Results to date show that fish can reduce sludge volumes by between 33% and 46% over a 70 day period in 1000L tanks.  Incorporating fish into primary effluent lagoons has the potential to significantly extend the timeframe between de-sludging events.

The humble goldfish is as smart as a cat or dog, can live more than a decade and can even count, a Perth researcher believes.  Read the full article by clicking on the picture or title...

It's not often scientists suggest they've found an entirely new group of animals, something so different that they can't be considered as belonging to one of the main groups, such as shellfish, insects, worms, jellyfish, sponges, animals with backbones (like us) and so on.  Read more about this fascinating underwater discovery by clicking on the title or picture...

This document was provided by the SEAGRANT program, and is 14 pages of everything you ever wanted to know about understanding water quality.  There is so much great material in here, we wanted to provide you a full download for your library!  Share the knowledge with your Koi Kichi friends and club members.  Get to the link by clicking on the title or picture...

What can run, but cannot walk?

Want to know how to get rid of this stuff?  If you were a renewing member – you would get the 4th Guide Supplement as a perk, and it includes a page showing various treatment chemicals and dosages.  If you want to become a member, order the PLUS membership which gives you the Guide PLUS all 4 Supplements!  The String Algae info is in Supplement #4.  Each year, when you renew your membership, we will send you a new Supplement with another 20+ valuable pages to help you with all the things you are likely to forget, conveniently bound together in one water-proof package.  K.O.I. wants to be YOUR source for current, accurate and useful information about Koi and ponds!

We have posted many article in this blog about Koi Food, but this one helps you understand the ingredients...  Read more by clicking on the title or picture.

If your answer includes "Nothing is too good for my Koi" - then read this article about saving a goldfish by clicking on the title or picture...

Mar. 8, 2013 — The newly described species Alburnoides manyasensis, belongs the large carp family Cyprinidae that includes freshwater fishes such as he carps, the minnows, and their relatives. This is the largest fish family, and more notably the largest family of vertebrate animals, with the remarkable numbers of over 2,400 species. Cyprinids are highly important food fish because they make the largest part of biomass in most water types except for fast-flowing rivers.  Read more by cliking on the title or picture...

Do you really want an in-depth understanding of the concepts of Alkalinity and Hardness?  OK - you asked for it!  Download the entire 36 page paper by Boyd, Tucker and Somridhivej published by the Journal of the World Aquaculture Society.  Get to the link by clicking on the title or picture...

While this study was done on Tilapia, the results proving that diet formations can enhance both growth rates and stress response have direct correlation to the Koi hobby.  Read the abstract by clicking on the title or picture...

The term Asian carp can be confusing, because it is generally applied to a group of related species, including the bighead (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), silver (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), grass (Ctenopharyngodon idella), and black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus). These fish can get quite large, up to 110 pounds, and they eat copious amounts of plankton. They are related to goldfish, Koi, and the common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The latter has already been established as an invasive species across most of North America for more than a century.

Read more about what is being done to control carp, about the extent of carp in the Illinois river, and identifying carp by gene sequencing - by clicking on the title or picture.

Behavioural experiments and brain research reveal surprising similarities between fish and humans. For example, some individuals are routine-bound creatures of habit, while others are better able to improvise, a new study shows.  Read the article by clicking on the title or picture...

Scientists have suspected that spare parts in the genome—extra copies of functional genes that arise when genes or whole genomes get duplicated—might sometimes provide the raw materials for the evolution of new traits. Now, researchers report in a study published online on September 3, 2009 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, that they have discovered a prime example of this in carp.  Read the full article by clicking on the title or picture...

Dropsy is sometimes known as "Pinecone Disease" in Koi, because the Koi's scales stick out from the swollen body, and the Koi resembles a pinecone.  It is often fatal.  Learn more about identification, pathology and treatments by clicking on the title or picture.

Turns out fish have natural sunscreen, and scientists have discovered a way to reproduce it for humans.  Read the article by clicking on the title or picture...

This article shows different behaviours of oxidative disinfectants in corrosivity and their relative efficacy under soiled conditions.  The study was done by the makers of Halamid, but is an excellent primer in understanding disinfectant issues.

OK - I seriously want this!  Pity we can't dine outside all winter in CT!

 

Ponds and Koi

General Facts About Water

by Don Harrawood

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!If you're not havin' FUN, you're not doin' it right


 

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