KHV release in Australia won't work twice

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KHV release in Australia won't work twice

November 27, 2018 - 10:43

New research from the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Australia, indicates that while the initial release of KHV will have high mortality, repeated outbreaks are unlikely to recur at a magnitude to counter the reproductive potential of the surviving carp.  Interesting!  Read the abstract for the study  or download the entire pdf...

An epidemiologic model of koi herpesvirus (KHV) biocontrol for carp in Australia

Joy A. Becker1*, Michael P. Ward2 and Paul M. Hick3

1425 Werombi Road, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, 2570

2425 Werombi Road, Sydney School of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, 2570

3OIE Reference Laboratory for Ranavirus infection of amphibians and Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus, Sydney School of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, 425 Werombi Road Camden 2570.

*Corresponding author email: joy.becker@sydney.edu.au

ABSTRACT

In Australia, the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is a significant pest species because it dominates fish communities in numerous catchment areas. In 2016, Australia launched a national control plan based on the use of Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV3) to reduce carp densities. CyHV3 is exotic to Australia and is listed as by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) due to its substantial impact on global aquaculture production. Infection with CyHV3 causes koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD), a high mortality disease in common carp affecting all age classes of both wild and farmed fish. The objective of this review was to consider the current knowledge of CyHV3 transmission factors and discuss the potential for recurring epidemic-level mortality events in carp found in Australia. Case studies were presented comparing KHVD outbreaks in wild carp in Japan and Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) outbreaks in pest redfin perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) in Australia. The release of CyHV3 in thermally-favourable waterways in Australia would undoubtedly cause one high mortality KHVD epidemic. However, there is little evidence to suggest that repeated CyHV3 outbreaks would recur at a magnitude to counter the reproductive potential of the surviving carp.

Keywords: Koi herpesvirus, Cyprinid herpesvirus 3, carp Cyprinus carpio, biocontrol, Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus, epidemiology, feral species, aquaculture

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© 2018 Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales


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